A dental practice is sold for a variety of reasons: retirement, moving to another city, or even because of health issues. Regardless of the reason, it is critical to consider the tax ramifications of the sale. Depending on the type of assets sold, the seller can pay federal and state taxes of up to 40% of the gain. For example, a majority, if not the entire amount of the equipment sold is likely to be taxable at the highest rates for both individual and corporate owners. This is because most dental equipment is written off in the year of purchase or depreciated over a 5 to 7 year period. Therefore, there is usually a minimal amount of basis in the equipment at the time of sale.

If a corporation owns real estate, the gain is taxed at the highest corporate rate. If an individual owns the real estate and leases it to the corporation or other legal entity, the tax on prior depreciation is 25% and the gain in excess of depreciation is 20%. Goodwill, patient records, and accounts receivable are also assets usually included in the sale of a dental practice and will be taxed at the 20% rate. Needless to say, the tax liability can be substantial resulting from an outright sale.

Example of an outright sale of a practice and resulting tax liability::

Equipment: $120,000 gain X 40% tax rate = $48,000

Receivables: $ 20,000 gain X 20% tax rate = $ 4.000

Records: $ 90,000 gain X 20% tax rate = $18,000

Real Estate $250,000 gain X 20% tax rate = $50,000

Goodwill $115,000 gain X 40% tax rate = $46,000

As you can see, the total tax liability of $166,000 on this hypothetical sale is staggering, but there is a way to defer these taxes … Read the rest

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